Buying a Dog From Kennel Ecarpadi


cimg2325.jpg

Kennel Ecarpadi is a member of The Swedish Kennel Club (SKK), The Swedish Mountain and Shepherd Dog Club (SBHK) and The Swedish Kuvasz Club. Hence we do follow their rules and statues. This means that the ones of our dogs that are being bred meet the health demands of these clubs and that we use SKK's agreements both when dogs move to fosterers and when they are being sold. This is a safety for both the fosterer/buyer and for us as breeders. We do of course comply with The Swedish Animal Welfare Act and The Swedish Animal Welfare Ordinance and we do expect the same from potential fosterers/buyers in Sweden or the equivalent rulings in other countries.

The puppies are ready to leave their mother when they are eight weeks old. A dog that is owned by us or that is being co-owned with us shall be kept in a good condition. We do of course wish that the same applies to dogs that have been sold. We are always available as a sounding board if problems, questions or concerns arise.

We use three different types of contracts; transfer agreement, transfer agreement with retained breeding rights and fosterer agreement. Explanation follows below.

 

Buying a dog

The transfer agreement (agreement of purchase) from SKK applies when one gets a dog in exchange for money. This contract is used when a dog is transferred to the buyer for full price without restrictions. This means that the breeder can't add other conditions, such as retained breeding rights, in the agreement.

 

Buying a puppy with retained breeding rights

A transfer agreement (agreement of purchase) with retained breeding rights is in Swedish popular speech called a half fosterer agreement. It is a form of co-ownership and means that half the price of the dog is paid for with money and the other half is paid for by the breeder retaining the right to use the dog in breeding with everything that comes with that. For instance the dog needs to be screened for hip dysplasia (x-ray), go through a mental assessment, be shown at dog shows and perhaps be genetically tested. The breeder is responsible for the costs associated with mating, whelping and breeding. All other costs (including insurance, vaccinations and other health care costs) is the responsibility of the buyer. It is therefor important that the buyer is willing to cooperate with the breeder. When it comes to females the breeder has the right to one litter (of minimum one puppy reaching at least five weeks of age) and for males the breeder has the right to three litters (of minimum one puppy reaching at least five weeks of age per litter). The exact number of litters is determined in the contract. The dog has been paid for when the breeder has used its breeding rights and the buyer then become the full owner of the dog. If the agreed litter number is not reached when the dog turns five years old the breeding rights expire and the buyer become the full owner (the breeder has the right to keep a bitch passed her fifth birthday if she mated right before she turned five and the puppies aren't ready to be weaned).

 

Being a fosterer

To be a fosterer means that no cash compensation is paid for the dog, instead the dog is paid for by the breeder retaining the right to breed the dog with all that comes with that. For instance the dog needs to be screened for hip dysplasia (x-ray), go through a mental assessment, be shown at dog shows and perhaps be genetically tested. The breeder is responsible for the costs associated with mating, whelping and breeding. All other costs (including insurance, vaccinations and other health care costs) is the responsibility of the buyer. It is therefor important that the buyer is willing to cooperate with the breeder. When it comes to females the breeder has the right to two litters (of minimum one puppy reaching at least five weeks of age per litter) and for males the breeder has the right to six litters (of minimum one puppy reaching at least five weeks of age per litter). The dog has been paid for when the breeder has used its breeding rights and the buyer then become the full owner of the dog. If the agreed number of litters is not reached five years after the agreement was erected, or when the dog turns seven years old, the breeding rights expire and the buyer become the full owner.